An Order-in-Council was issued on November 25, 1869, refusing a request to commute Nicholas Melady’s death sentence for the gruesome murder of his father.  Melady’s hanging on December 7 was the last one in a public place in Canada. Photos courtesy of Library and Archives Canada

An Order-in-Council was issued on November 25, 1869, refusing a request to commute Nicholas Melady’s death sentence for the gruesome murder of his father.  Melady’s hanging on December 7 was the last one in a public place in Canada.

Photos courtesy of Library and Archives Canada

Players in the Deadly Game of Hangman in Canada

THE FEDERAL CABINET

When someone was convicted of a capital crime, the presiding judge was required to submit a detailed report to the minister of justice in Ottawa.

The federal Cabinet and officials of the Department of Justice would review the case. At the end of this sometimes lengthy process, cabinet would make the ultimate decision on what sentence to impose. If they resolved that the law “be allowed to take its course,” an Order-in-Council was issued instructing the local Authorities to proceed with the execution

Excerpted from Drop Dead by Lorna Poplak Copyright © Lorna Poplak, 2017

 

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An Order-in-Council was issued on November 25, 1869, refusing a request to commute Nicholas Melady’s death sentence for the gruesome murder of his father.  Melady’s hanging on December 7 was the last one in a public place in Canada. Photo courtesy of Library and Archives Canada